Search Results for: Cooking

Get Plenty of Firewood Ready!

Get Plenty of Firewood Ready!

If you’re new to outdoor cooking, you might be in for a surprise the first time you cook up a simple shore lunch.  One of those surprises might be just how much firewood you’ll need. If you’re right in the middle of the cooking part, meaning potatoes on the go, beans warming up in their can, fish in the pan, and then you realize you need more dry firewood, you might be in trouble, especially if what you started with [Read More]

Wash Your Friggin’ Hands!

Wash Your Friggin’ Hands

“Always wash up before you begin cooking for your guests” Okay, you are guiding your fishermen, your guests, your clients or whatever you want to call them. You’ve been fishing all morning, having a great time slammin’ walleyes. Now, it’s time for shore lunch. I can honestly say, I can HONESTLY say, that, after watching at least 200 guides cook shore lunch, I have never seen anyone wash their hands before cooking the food. If you were working in a [Read More]

Cast Iron Cookware

Cast Iron Cookware

I just love cooking with the old time, cast iron pans.  And, the Dutch ovens are excellent for making stew, soup or for roasting or braising.  They’re tough, rugged, (my favourite word), and once seasoned, cast iron makes an excellent, non-stick cooking surface.  I fry eggs on mine all the time… over easy. One huge advantage of cooking with cast iron fry pans is when you are roasting something like a roast of moose, pork tenderloin or a chicken.  You [Read More]

Mise en Place

Mise en Place

If you go to culinary school one of the first things you’ll learn is something called, “Mise’ en Place.”  This French term, when translated roughly means “everything in place.”  Or, more to the point, “preparation.”  Most of today’s culinary terms and chef lingo are in French because the foundation for modern cooking practices originated in France many years ago.This is by far one of the most important elements to being a successful home cook, never mind a restaurant chef. Being [Read More]

Mirepoix

Mirepoix

One of the most standard, basic food and flavour combinations in all of cooking is a mixture of onions, carrots and celery. This is known as a mirepoix. Yes, it’s a French term and it’s been used in Classical French Cuisine for hundreds of years. It’s one of the first things taught in culinary school. A mirepoix usually consists of twice the amount of onion, as carrot and celery… meaning if you have 1 pound of onions, you’d use ½ [Read More]

How to Cook on a Wood Burning Cook Stove (without going mental!)

How to Cook on a Wood Burning Cook Stove

When I think about things like living off the grid or homesteading, an old wood burning cook stove comes to mind, right away.  I couldn’t live the way I do without one. “The focus of my Ultra-Rugged kitchen!” Some of my fondest memories of when I was a kid were when I used to watch my Grandmother cooking on the old wood stove. There was something really special about coming down the stairs on the opening morning of duck season [Read More]

Wild Mallard Duck with Mushroom Risotto

Wild Mallard Duck with Mushroom Risotto

I love eating duck, especially wild duck.  Mallard is the most plentiful and the most popular, but others like the wood duck, teal, and widgeon are also excellent.  There are many other species of wild duck that are top shelf for the table.  And, with a beaver pond (and my duck blind) only 200 yards from my back door, eating duck is a common occurrence for me throughout the fall and winter. Wild duck can be dry as it’s very [Read More]

Moose (or venison) Stew

Moose (or venison) Stew

Okay, time to get back the basics of what I would refer to as “rugged food!”  Stew – whether you use moose, venison, grouse, rabbit or even chicken… a good stew is hard to beat.  As I type this on November 10, 2013, it’s a surprisingly cold day out there – minus 26 Celsius with the wind chill factored in.  Even though I’m sitting about fifteen feet from my woodstove, my nipples are hard just thinking about it… and my onions [Read More]

Bake (or boil) ’em First!

Bake (or boil) ’em First!

The classic “trucker” breakfast always comes with home-fries.  Crispy-fried potatoes along with bacon and eggs is a requirement in my opinion.  And, to make them lighter tasting and to decrease the cooking time, used potatoes that have already been cooked.  This way, all you’ll need to do is simply crisp them up and build some flavours. The best (and easiest) way is to bake them in advance.  When I used run a restaurant back in 1999, we did a pretty big breakfast [Read More]

Remove the Silver Skin

Remove the Silver Skin

Probably the tastiest and most tender meat from a deer (or moose) are the loins.  A lot of people, especially hunters, call them “back straps” while some people, especially butchers, call them “saddles.”  There are two – one down each side of the spine and they’re easy to remove yourself when your deer is hanging.  Pictured are the back straps from a small white tailed deer that I shot last fall. Since these back straps are such a treat (and there are only two [Read More]